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Philadelphia Employment Law News

5 Ways to Fund Your Small Business Without Banks

Since the financial crash of 2008, obtaining a small business loan from a bank can be difficult. So how can you find your small business without banks?

Banks want to see a financial track record for your business that proves that you'll be able to repay the money they're lending, according to Bloomberg Businessweek.

So if funding your business through a bank is out of the question, here are five alternative options:

Can You Fire Someone For Not Smiling?

Marie Rogai, the former principal of Cardinal O'Hara High School, has filed a lawsuit against Archdiocese of Philadelphia alleging that she was fired for not smiling enough, according to Philly.com.

Most positions are at-will employment, which means that employers can pretty much terminate your job at any time for almost any reason.

However, even if the employment is at-will, employers can still be sued for wrongful termination if they fire a worker for illegal reasons.

20 Common Interview Questions That Are Illegal to Ask

People often assume common interview questions are lawful questions. But alas, some of the most common questions employers ask during interviews cross the boundary into potentially unlawful employment practices.

To help you figure out the do's and don'ts of interview questions, let's play a game of 20 questions.

Should Your Business Have a 'No Fraternization' Policy?

With love in the air this week, businesses might be considering a "no fraternization" policy for the workplace.

The Carl Greene case a few years back may ring a bell for Philadelphia business owners. Greene was found to be a "serial sexual harasser" who allegedly quickly promoted a woman and later demoted her after he found out she was dating another employee.

To avoid workplace romance issues like Greene's, it might be best to have a "no fraternization" policy in place.

How to File an EEOC Complaint in Pennsylvania

If you believe that you were unlawfully discriminated against at work, you can file a discrimination complaint with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

Here are the three first steps to take to file an EEOC complaint in Pennsylvania:

Can Smokers Be Denied Job Offers?

A few hospitals in Pennsylvania began testing employment candidates for nicotine and could deny smokers from getting the job.

Treating nicotine like drugs and alcohol could mean that potential employees could lose their job offers if they test positive for nicotine, according to Philadelphia Magazine.

Although some people may think denying smokers the job is extreme, this isn't the first time that smoking has interfered with employment.

Amazon Workers Want Pay for Time in Security Line

Amazon warehouse employees in multiple states, including Pennsylvania, have filed lawsuits against Amazon, claiming that they've been short-changed. The lawsuits collectively allege that Amazon has a policy of requiring workers to wait in line for security metal detectors without being paid, The Morning Call reports.

These suits also come on the heels of earlier complaints against Amazon for certain employee theft-prevention practices that allegedly violate state and federal labor laws.

What can employers legally do about employee theft, and is compensation required for the employees who have to wait to pass through anti-theft checkpoints?

When Can You Be Drug Tested at Work in Pa.?

When can you be drug tested at work in Pennsylvania? The answer may not be as obvious as you think.

Chances are, as an employee or an employer, you'll run into a situation that calls for drug testing in the workplace. So, with that in mind, here's a rundown of what drug testing looks like in Pennsylvania:

Are Employers Required to Give Jury Duty Leave in Pennsylvania?

Are employers in Pennsylvania required to give their employees time off for jury duty? As both employees and employers know, jury duty escapes no one. On top of that, miss jury duty, and you could face penalties like fines or even jail time.

So, while we know that jury duty is more or less required when you're summoned, what does this mean for those who have regular, working day jobs? Are there laws that require an employer to pay an employee for jury duty or just to allow them to miss work for it? Here's a general breakdown of jury duty law in Pennsylvania:

Anti-discrimination laws exist in every state to prevent discrimination against employees based on disability and other protected categories. Both Pennsylvania law and federal law require Philadelphia businesses to afford those employees some reasonable accommodations.

Here are three common situations in which a business is legally required to accommodate an employee and prohibited from discrimination: